Curated by UCL

Correcting robot mistakes using mind control without thinking

When it comes to controlling robots, it isn’t just a matter of finding ways to give them commands, but of making sure they’re carrying out those commands properly. To help with this, a team from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial…

When it comes to controlling robots, it isn’t just a matter of finding ways to give them commands, but of making sure they’re carrying out those commands properly. To help with this, a team from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Boston University has come up with a system that turns the operator into a human automatic fault detector to alert the robot when it makes a mistake.

Mind-controlled robots aren’t new, but they’re also still very much in the developmental phase. Direct control from brain to machine may do away with the problems of a mechanical interface or teaching a robot to respond to voice commands, but by itself it isn’t enough. It’s one thing to order a robot to do this or that, but it’s another thing entirely to get to do it right.