Curated by UCL

Young gamers are inventing their own controllers to get around their disabilities

A little over 10 years ago Nintendo changed the game with the release of the original Wii console. Featuring motion controllers that allowed users’ arm and body movements to control their video games, the system was wildly successful going on…

A little over 10 years ago Nintendo changed the game with the release of the original Wii console. Featuring motion controllers that allowed users’ arm and body movements to control their video games, the system was wildly successful going on to sell more than 100 million units worldwide.

This was followed by 2012’s Wii U console, which didn’t fare as well. With a large “second screen” controller packed in, part of Wii U’s goal was to provide asymmetric gaming, where the player with the larger GamePad had more or different options to those who might be playing with more traditional controllers.